The Goodes and bad of this world

LOTS of issues have been making the news recently.

People stood up for Adam Goodes.

An echidna was kidnapped, and Kim Kardashian’s book of selfies flopped.

Inmates have been trying to tunnel out at the Supermax jail, and our Madam Speaker has left the building - but not by air this time.

And big news through just last week ... Golden Gaytime now comes in a one litre tub.

That is a whole bucket of Australia’s favourite ice cream. I don’t think I need to tell you how much fun that bit of news is.

Here’s some food for thought, pun totally intended, imagine being an international visitor to Australia.

You step off the plane and see the headlines of the day, top of the list being that Australians are losing their minds over a bucket of ice cream. This first impression can go either way depending on your point of view, but it does go a long way to illustrate that most Australian thing about us all, is that we love a good laugh (and our ice cream).

We are passionate about things that matter, but so much more about the things that don’t.

Then along came a dentist with his bow and arrow, hunting for big game.

Anyone who has been following my columns will be aware of my stance on animal cruelty.

It was painful to hear that this poor lion suffered for 40 hours wounded while they tracked him to finish him off.

Things have to change. They should not suffer in this way.

What a way to go. Animal lovers around the world reacted accordingly, even going so far as vandalising the hunters American home.

Pressure from animal activists has seen airlines place a ban on the transportation of big game trophies, and for a moment I thought that this would be a good thing.

Looking into what may change as a result of this hunter’s actions, it was surprising to find out that should a ban be placed on big game hunting in Zimbabwe it will have a negative effect on the animal population.

Turns out that hunters directly contribute around two hundred million to the African economy and this pays for conservation of the lands and the animals protection.

They have regulations in place for which animals can be hunted.

In Kenya, Tanzania and Zambia trophy hunting has been banned for some time, and there has been a marked drop in their wildlife population.

One of those damned if we do and damned if we don’t situations, although it doesn’t mean that hunting should be carried out in the way we have seen with poor Cecil the Lion.

Better restrictions and protections need to be in place, this is the trade off we have to have to conserve these beautiful creatures.

A bit of extra information goes a long way in this case, given that public opinion is strong and uncompromising, next time the jump to conclusions (in my case) won’t be so quick.