Speaking Colour’s exhibition, a celebration of Aboriginal culture

SETTING UP: Curator, Angela D'Ellia, setting up shop at the Speaking Colours exhibition in the Goulburn Regional Art Gallery. Photo: Mariam Koslay.
SETTING UP: Curator, Angela D'Ellia, setting up shop at the Speaking Colours exhibition in the Goulburn Regional Art Gallery. Photo: Mariam Koslay.

That’s the question curator Ms Angela D’Ellia for the Goulburn Regional Arts Gallery is asking in the upcoming exhibition, Speaking Colours.

The gallery will host 30 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Island artists from all over Australia to celebrate the diversity of language and the difference in culture.

GALLERY SPACE READY: To host 33 pieces of Aboriginal work from all over Australia. Photo: Mariam Koslay.

GALLERY SPACE READY: To host 33 pieces of Aboriginal work from all over Australia. Photo: Mariam Koslay.

The idea for the exhibition came after Ms D’Ellia touched eyes on the Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders Studies (AIATSIS) map. The map, which represents the language and tribal groups of Aboriginal people in Australia, was the key catalyst for her inspiration.

“There is an important cultural links to language and it’s important that these are not lost,” she said.

Curator of Speaking Colours, Ms D'Ellia.

“There are multiple coloured sections on the map, and it’s these sections that show the diversity of language which is where I got the title, Speaking Colours,” she said.

Illustrating the significance of preserving languages, one of the biggest message Ms D’Ellia wants to spread is the range and quantity of languages amongst Aboriginal people. Due to the widespread adoption of English, many of the languages are no longer spoken, or used by a handful of people.   

“There is an important cultural links to language and it’s important that these are not lost,” she said.

The 33 art works, which will be coming from 12 different regions in Australia, will showcase traditional paintings, sculptures, textiles, ceramic and audio visual pieces. Artists include Blak Douglas, Emily Kame Kngwarreye, Reko Rennie and many more.

For more information on Speaking Colours head to http://www.grag.com.au/site/