Taralga News | April 19

A WEDDING

Sophie Cummins and Brad Brown were married at St Mary’s Star of the Sea Catholic Church, Milton on April 1, 2017.

Sophie’s attendants were her sister, Annie, her cousin, Danielle Bewick, groom’s sister, Liz Brown and friend, Jessica Musgrave.

The groomsmen were Brad’s brother, James, and mates Cameron Varley, Matthew Maloney and Nicolas Kellar.

GORGEOUS: Sophie Cummins and Brad Brown were married at Milton's Star of the Sea Catholic Church on April 1 followed by a reception at Mollymook Golf Club.

GORGEOUS: Sophie Cummins and Brad Brown were married at Milton's Star of the Sea Catholic Church on April 1 followed by a reception at Mollymook Golf Club.

The reception was held at Mollymook Golf Club where the couple celebrated their nuptials with family and friends overlooking the sunset on the spectacular Mollymook Beach.

Sophie and Brad honeymooned in Hawaii. They have made their home in Queanbeyan.

Brad and Sophie met at the Australian Catholic University where they graduated in Bachelor of Education in Primary School teaching and Masters in Religious Education. They are both teaching, Sophie at St Thomas More, Canberra and Brad at St Gregory’s Primary School, Queanbeyan.

VALE BILL WALSH

A strong supporter of the Anglican Church, Bill bought a property in the Curraweela district but retired to a home in Goulburn before taking up residence in Warrigal.

Bill was an enthusiastic founding member of the  Art Group and had an active interest in politics.

Bill is survived by a daughter in Sydney and another who works as a missionary in Spain.

MEETUP

Next Thursday, April 20 MeetUp will be held as usual with morning tea at 10am followed by Anzac activities but the following week Friday, April 28 the venue will be the Taralga Hotel with Tai-chi Deep Breathing as the activity.

CHARLES McALISTER’S MEMORIES

Charles McAlister’s book on Pioneering Days contains many stories of his travels around the country.

Charles’s first droving trip, he says, was to Kimo, Gundagai in 1848. His route was by Gurrundah to Burrowa, thence by Jugiong Creek to Kimo. Burrowa (Boorowa?) then was said to consist of a public house and store, a blacksmith’s shop, and a few bark huts near by and along the creek some gunyahs.

The old joke was said to be if a stone was thrown down a Burrowa street it would hit  a Ryan or Dwyer if it missed a Hurley or a Corcoran.

He says in 1856 he and his brother drove a mob of 80 horses to the market in Melbourne. The magistrate in Deniliquin had Charles’s brother up for “furious riding” when he prevented the horses entering a farmer’s crop.

Also related is the story, on a previous trip, of William hanging his spurs on a bush and forgetting to pick them up.

As they were near that spot in the scrub the spurs were looked for and found still on the bush. Charles says “a tribute to the honesty of the Blacks and Bilbies of old times”.  He speaks of seeing “the almost extinct marsupials” out near Condobolin in 1866.

The author speaks glowingly of the country in the Riverina, the Tablelands and the Murray. He was pleased that the horses sold for an average of twenty five pounds!

He speaks of witnessing the departure of Burke and Wills when he made his third trip to the Melbourne horse sales in 1860.

WITNESSING HISTORY: Burke and Wills depart Melbourne in 1860, as seen by Charles McAlister. Photo: Culture Victoria.

WITNESSING HISTORY: Burke and Wills depart Melbourne in 1860, as seen by Charles McAlister. Photo: Culture Victoria.

Burke, he said, was on a big grey horse at the head of the party and there was the unusual sight of camels in the Melbourne streets.

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