Goulburn Parents share pressure of social media

Social media is great for sharing a slice of our lives with friends and family far away, but sometimes it creates pressure to have a picture-perfect life - and this can be exaggerated at Christmastime.

A real snapshot of Christmas or a cookie cutter depiction that fuels unrealistic expectations?

A real snapshot of Christmas or a cookie cutter depiction that fuels unrealistic expectations?

Our daily feeds show off images of our friends’ Pinterest-worthy exploits.

There’s Elf on the Shelf, homemade advent calendars, Santa photos with immaculately dressed and beaming children, flawlessly decorated Christmas trees and flashing light displays (sometimes set to music), homemade goodies left out for Santa, piles of presents underneath the trees and platter after platter of mouth-watering meats, veggies and desserts.

LOCAL LEADER: Alisa Stephens from Goulburn Parents.

LOCAL LEADER: Alisa Stephens from Goulburn Parents.

It can be lovely to share in the joys of far away friends but sometimes scrolling through your feed feels a little like you’re not living up to expectations, with your store bought chocolate advent (showing the wrong date), your solitary string of solar lights, messy living room, and tantrum-throwing toddler.

But it’s important to remember that those beautiful scenes on social media are all carefully chosen to show off moments in their best possible light.

They don’t reflect reality.

We owe it to ourselves to not feel that social media pressure to have a flawless Christmas.

And maybe we owe it to our friends too, to share the odd moment that shows that our imperfections.

A selfie with a grumpy teen, a shot of the kitchen chaos behind the platters. or a short video of your three-year-old crying for chocolate instead of dinner.

Those moments are part of life too - and worth sharing and remembering in years to come.