Goulburn-Mulwaree population to reach 37,000 by 2036

With recent revelations that Sydney and Melbourne could become the size of global cities like London by as early as 2050, it begs the question what our regional cities will look like in the coming years.

ON EXHIBITION: A DA for one of the new proposed estates at 133 Marys Mount Rd is on exhibition. It lists up to 393 lots available across a total area of 61ha.

ON EXHIBITION: A DA for one of the new proposed estates at 133 Marys Mount Rd is on exhibition. It lists up to 393 lots available across a total area of 61ha.

According to projections from the NSW Government’s Planning and Environment department the Goulburn Mulwaree Council area could have a population of 37,202 by the year 2036.

The 2016 population, which sat at 30,156, is expected to climb to 32,167 in 2021, 32,863 in 2026, 35,567 in 2031 and up to 37,202  in 2036.

The number of households is expected to rise from the 2016 figure of 12,235 to 13,114 in 2021.

By 2026 it is expected to hit 13,898, by 2031 it is expected to rise to 14,668 and by 2036 it could hit 15,405.

But what does this mean for the number of dwellings?

In 2016 there were 13,739 dwellings. 

This is expected to rise to 17,098 by 2035.

Age projections predict that there will be 1,800 people over the age of 85 in 2036 and 2,200 in the 70 to 74 age bracket.

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Monday’s Four Corners program on ABC highlighted the role migration would play in the growth of urban populations.

NSW opposition leader Luke Foley said Sydney's pull as the largest city and a job magnet has contributed to one third of the nation's migrants coming to the city.

One year out from a state election Mr Foley has called for a set number to be placed on Australia's migrant intake - to be made in consultation with all states and territories and the federal government.

"Sydney full of towers is the inevitable consequence of the current very large migrant intake," Mr Foley told 2GB radio.

It follows similar calls by former prime minister Tony Abbott to cut migration rates.

The comments come as Australia's population is expected to tick over 25 million this year - a figure the nation wasn't meant to reach for decades.

Former NSW premier Bob Carr told ABC TV's Four Corners program the consequences could mean restricting access to recreational spaces by erecting fences and turnstiles around Sydney's beaches.

Australian businessman Dick Smith, who last year launched a $1 million TV campaign calling for a limit to the number of immigrants, sees disaster for the Australian way of life.

He told Four Corners the Australian dream of owning a family home was no longer possible.