Goulburn's boomerang bags bounce out the door

IN THE BAG: Workspace 2580 computer trainer and tutor Stephen Allen and project manager Julie Kelly show off the wide array of Boomerang Bags. Photo: Louise Thrower.
IN THE BAG: Workspace 2580 computer trainer and tutor Stephen Allen and project manager Julie Kelly show off the wide array of Boomerang Bags. Photo: Louise Thrower.

They’ve been to the Pumpkin Festival, the Goulburn Show, to Riversdale, overseas and have been spotted at supermarkets around town.

Boomerang Bags are taking off in a big way and have bigger things in store, says Workspace 2580 project manager Julie, Kelly.

Since 2016, 800 of the colourful cloth bags have been distributed to people focused on reducing the amount of plastic going to landfill. The recyclable bags were an initiative of the One Million Women Project, and Australian movement aimed at environmental sustainability and female empowerment. 

“It’s been a phenomenal movement,” Mrs Kelly said of the bags.

“It’s helped change attitudes. I notice it in the street and I think it's great.”

A group of volunteers, including Goulburn Soroptimists, Gallery on Track, Goulburn High School students and individuals sew the bags from often recycled cloth. More recently, Workspace 2580 has provided the kits which incorporate donated material.

Workspace sells them for $4 each. But it has also distributed them free of charge. Many use them at the supermarket instead of plastic bags. Mrs Kelly said the not-for-profit organisation was also working with Woolworths  to place them in its supermarkets. In addition, netted bags for vegetables are in the making.

International Women for Peace, which operates an office from Workspace, also took some overseas. 

“It (the initiative) is very much in line with Community Plus’s philosophy,” Mrs Kelly said.

“We are there to support community start-ups and social enterprises and this is a way of bringing people together. It is all about connecting communities.”

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