Farmers want action on climate change

FRUSTRATION: Crookwell farmer Charlie Prell speaking at a rally out the front of Parliament House on Monday. Photo supplied.

FRUSTRATION: Crookwell farmer Charlie Prell speaking at a rally out the front of Parliament House on Monday. Photo supplied.

Angry farmers rallied outside Parliament House in Canberra on Monday.

One of the main speakers at the rally was Crookwell farmer Charlie Prell. 

Mr Prell is also the Farmers for Climate Action deputy chairman. 

Addressing a large crowd at the rally, Mr Prell said farmers were there to make the politicians change their minds and address climate change.

“We are here on the first sitting day of the Morrison Government to tell them that farmers across this country want significant action to address the threat of climate change,” he said.

“We as farmers are sick of the prevaricating that is going on in the house behind me.

“While the country is burning (in the middle of winter) these people continue to argue over their internal disputes 

“Like Nero they fiddle with leadership chairs while Australia burns and the reef bleaches.

“We are here to tell these people that we are taking action now and if they try and resist this revolution they will be run over by the tide of people power.

“Sea levels are rising rapidly, but not as quickly as the tide of public disgust at the inaction in this country to address the greatest moral challenge of out time.” 

“The by-election in Wagga last Saturday demonstrated the disgust of regional Australians in the political status.

“The primary vote for the Liberal Party dropped by 30 per cent. They are going to lose a seat they have held for 60 years. An independent who has been advocating for strong action on climate change won the primary vote in a canter.

“This is the freight train that is coming for those who refuse to act in the public interest.”

Mr Prell also spoke about the benefits wind farms can bring to regional Australia. 

“Wind and solar infrastructure is being built in regional Australia, so farmers like me get the royalties. I am employing two people at Gundowringa and their jobs are immune from the drought because of the income I am getting from the wind turbines,” he said. 

“My cousin across the road from me is doing the same. 

“We are not doing it easy, but we have a new level of resilience because this income stream is not dependent on the weather.

He said the royalties not only go to the hosts, but money also circulates back through the community for useful community projects and amenities.