A modern education at Goulburn High School

Re-casting the library: Students utilising one of the future-focused learning spaces with modular furniture to promote creativity, collaboration and critical thinking. Photos: Supplied.
Re-casting the library: Students utilising one of the future-focused learning spaces with modular furniture to promote creativity, collaboration and critical thinking. Photos: Supplied.

Goulburn High School has a number of activities planned to mark the occasion of NSW Education Week from Monday August 3 to Friday August 7.

Throughout the week, each faculty will be implementing learning activities based on this year's theme of Learning Together.

They'll participate in the state-wide virtual celebration, as well as having a staff celebration morning tea plus a barbeque for students.

They're also including a daily heritage quiz into the mornings' roll call classes.

In terms of its own history, they are the oldest school in Goulburn, and with continued development to the facilities, classes and programs, they offer students a modern education.

Learning Together: "Our roll out of Chromebooks has improved computer access for all students and promoted collaborative teaching and learning activities".

Learning Together: "Our roll out of Chromebooks has improved computer access for all students and promoted collaborative teaching and learning activities".

"Goulburn High School has been an educational cornerstone of the region since 1883 with its first classes being delivered in Balmoral House on the corner of Citizen, Cowper and Hurst streets," says deputy principal Yogesh Mani.

"From this temporary home the State of NSW built the historical main block that the school resides in today with operation commencing in 1928 under the Principal Mr C. Blumer."

The expansion continued with new buildings, the ag plot and more, and a range of subjects covering everything from agriculture to zoology. "A sporting culture has risen as well with the Smith Cup at the forefront. This inter-school competition with Bowral High School began in 1928 and is the longest-running competition [of its type] in the Southern Hemisphere.

"In recent times, the school has expanded the diversity of extra curricula and sporting competitions. An active art and music scene is alive at the school with an annual Showcase and other events throughout the year to celebrate and present the success of students. Along with extra curricula growth, the school has deepened students' engagement in technology needed for success in the modern world becoming the foundation of teaching practice."

Technology: GHS has modern tools such as these 3D printers plus laser cutters, virtual and augmented reality equipment, and robotics.

Technology: GHS has modern tools such as these 3D printers plus laser cutters, virtual and augmented reality equipment, and robotics.

A couple of the highlights over the past year or so include "development of a STEM Centre for robotics, 3D printing, augmented reality and virtual reality," and "re-casting of the library as a space for future-focussed learning."

They have also welcomed an educational support dog named Alice, who was introduced to support students with specific behavioural and learning needs.

Looking forward they have multiple improvements planned for the immediate future, such as upgrades to the oval and the general assistant's facilities. They're also adding cloud rooms, an Aboriginal Mentor Program, an Applied Learning Greenhouse plus Catalyst Program, the new position of a student wellbeing support officer, and a Sensory Space development in Wellbeing with funding from a grant.

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