Timely discussion on regional public transport to take centre stage for Politics in the Pub

Southern Tablelands Rail User Group (STRUG) president Greg Price will be one of the speakers for Politics in the Pub on April 16.
Southern Tablelands Rail User Group (STRUG) president Greg Price will be one of the speakers for Politics in the Pub on April 16.

It’s all things transport as Politics in the Pub (PITP) tackles regional public transport on April 16 at 6.30pm. 

The panel will be made up of recently announced Goulburn Labor candidate Ursula Stephens, Goulburn National Party representative James Harker-Mortlock, and Southern Tablelands Rail User Group (STRUG) president Greg Price.

“Regional public transportation was chosen as a subject by the Goulburn Nationals a couple of months back, and is always a problem so we are happy to provide a platform for people to raise their concerns,” PITP organiser Jason Shepherd said. 

“At the moment regional areas have little to none reliable public transportation between villages, towns and regional cities; and what transportation we have with state capitals is less than useful.”

When questioned by the Goulburn Post as to if Member for Goulburn Pru Goward was invited to join the panel, Mr Shepherd said there was an “an open invitation to any and all of our panels”

“MP Pru Goward and Member for Hume Angus Taylor have an open invitation to any and all of our panels,” he said. 

“We will chase [panelists] to attend sometimes but it only ever works if they show an interest, we cannot force them.” 

The focus on the regional train network comes after Transport for NSW released a 40-year vision on regional and metro networks, Consolidated Land and Rail Australia (CLARA) has won federal funding for fast rail, and residents have criticised changes to the Goulburn rail timetable

“This is related to the quality of life for regional Australians as more and more regional health and government services are cut. People need to travel further and further but how do they do that if they are not wealthy or able to drive?” he said.

“We need to increase regional public transport and to reduce inequality and help people live their lives with as little disruption as possible.”

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